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Courses in English

History

Courses - Spring 2020

HI1450 History of the Swedish Welfare State (first cycle)

The course gives an overview over the Swedish welfare state and its historical and ideological roots. Analysing the joint influence of the social, economic and political forces that led to the formation of the Swedish welfare state significant social, economic and political developments will be dealt with, including class and gender aspects. In addition the course will discuss different historical interpretations of the welfare state. Also some international comparisons will be done.

History of the Swedish Welfare State (15HEC)

HI1440 Western Colonialism and Imperialism (first cycle, both terms)

The course offers an overview of European colonialism from the 15th to the 20th centuries, with the main focus on the imperial expansion in the 19th- and 20th centuries. Questions of driving forces and power-relations are addressed, as well as cultural perspectives on the encounters between the continents. Special attention is paid to different historical interpretations of imperialism. Moreover the importance of the colonial experience in present day world is discussed.

Western Colonialism and Imperialism (15 HEC)

Sweden and the Nordic countries in the early modern era (ca 1500-1800)

In the 17th and early 18th centuries Sweden was considered to be one of the great powers of Europe. Sweden was the leading protestant state and had territorial control over parts of the Baltic region and territories that used to be member states of the Holy Roman Empire.
This course gives you an overview of Sweden and the Nordic region in the early modern period (approx. 1500-1800). The course is based on current research. Social, cultural, economic and political developments in the Nordic countries, Europe and the world during the early modern era changed Sweden’s role. Through seminars and lectures you will discuss key themes of Sweden and the Nordic region such as the development of the absolute state, power relations and gender relations in the early modern society.
Questions that may arise in seminars and lectures during the course are: How did the state and the government legitimize their position and their policy? What opportunities did ordinary people have to reach political influence?

Sweden and the Nordic countries in the early modern era (ca 1500-1800) (15HEC)

HI2180 Therapy for conflictual histories - working through a problematic past (spring term)

In recent years the use of history is a topic that has had a growing impact on history education, research and public debate. The aim of this course is to develop uses of history that go beyond traditional research and communication skills and are rather focused the application of history. A general purpose is to explore the possibilities for the historian to act as a ”social therapist”. Different theoretical perspectives on working through the past are introduced, e.g. construction of identities, mourning and conflict management. The problems are illustrated by particular cases. An important dimension of the course is to let the students themselves critically reflect and apply history in different cases of a problematic past, mainly European conflicts of interpretation with ethnic, political or social aspects.

Therapy for conflictual histories - working through a problematic past (15 HEC)

Courses - Autumn 2020 

HI1430 Viking and Medieval Scandinavian History

The course gives an overview of viking and medieval Scandinavian history. Significant social, economic, and political developments are treated. The influence of Christianity and the Church during this era receives much attention; how a more united medieval Europe emerged through the church and how this influenced the Scandinavian countries. The state building process and political culture is of great interest. Differences and similarities between Scandinavia and rest of Europe are also focused as well as later views on viking and medieval Europe. Teaching language: English.

Viking and Medieval Scandinavian History (15 HEC)

HI1440 Western Colonialism and Imperialism (first cycle, both terms)

The course offers an overview of European colonialism from the 15th to the 20th centuries, with the main focus on the imperial expansion in the 19th- and 20th centuries. Questions of driving forces and power-relations are addressed, as well as cultural perspectives on the encounters between the continents. Special attention is paid to different historical interpretations of imperialism. Moreover the importance of the colonial experience in present day world is discussed.

Western Colonialism and Imperialism (15 HEC)

Sweden and the Nordic countries in the early modern era (ca 1500-1800)

In the 17th and early 18th centuries Sweden was considered to be one of the great powers of Europe. Sweden was the leading protestant state and had territorial control over parts of the Baltic region and territories that used to be member states of the Holy Roman Empire.
This course gives you an overview of Sweden and the Nordic region in the early modern period (approx. 1500-1800). The course is based on current research. Social, cultural, economic and political developments in the Nordic countries, Europe and the world during the early modern era changed Sweden’s role. Through seminars and lectures you will discuss key themes of Sweden and the Nordic region such as the development of the absolute state, power relations and gender relations in the early modern society.
Questions that may arise in seminars and lectures during the course are: How did the state and the government legitimize their position and their policy? What opportunities did ordinary people have to reach political influence? 

Sweden and the Nordic countries in the early modern era (ca 1500-1800) (15HEC)

Page Manager: Katarina Tullia von Sydow|Last update: 9/20/2019
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